Parsley

Parsley

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Usage:
Asthma, Bladder infections (UTIs), Bruises, Cough.
Cracked or chapped skin, Digestive problems, Fluid retention and swelling (edema), Insect bites, Kidney stones, Liver disorders, Menstrual problems, Tumors.

Want to learn more?  We knew you did...

Parsley is an annual herb indigenous to the Mediterranean region, but now cultivated worldwide. It has erect stems and bright green leaves. Two cultivars of parsley exist: a curly leaf type and a flat leaf type. Parsley produces an umbel of tiny flowers and characteristic ribbed seeds.

Caution must be used when gathering wild parsley because of the general similarity of its leaves and flowers to 3 common poisonous plants. The first, Aethusa cynapium (dog poison, fool's parsley, small hemlock) may be distinguished from parsley by the shiny, yellow-green underside of the leaves, which are dull in parsley, and the white flowers, which are yellowish in parsley.

Similarly, collectors should be aware of Conium maculatum (poison hemlock, water hemlock, poison parsley) and Cicuta maculata (water hemlock). Poison hemlock is a much larger plant than common parsley. Poisonings have occurred when the leaves of Conium were mistaken for parsley and the seeds for anise. Symptoms of Conium and Cicuta poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, paralysis, weak pulse, dilated pupils, convulsions, and death.Parsley is an herb. The leaf, seed, and root are used to make medicine.

Some people take parsley by mouth for bladder infections (UTIs), kidney stones (nephrolithiasis), gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, constipation, diabetes, cough, asthma, and high blood pressure.

In some women it is taken by mouth to start menstrual flow or to cause an abortion.

Some people apply parsley directly to the skin for dark patches on the face, cracked or chapped skin, bruises, tumors, insect bites, and to stimulate hair growth.

In foods and beverages, parsley is widely used as a garnish, condiment, food, and flavoring.

In manufacturing, parsley seed oil is used as a fragrance in soaps, cosmetics, and perfumes.

How does it work?
Parsley might help stimulate the appetite, improve digestion, increase urine production, reduce spasms, and increase menstrual flow.
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Possible side effects include:

  • Parsley can cause allergic skin reactions.
  • Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Eating parsley in food amounts is fine, but parsley in larger medicinal amounts is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy. Parsley has been used to cause an abortion and to start menstrual flow. In addition, developing evidence suggests that taking An-Tai-Yin, an herbal combination product containing parsley and dong quai, during the first three months of pregnancy increases the risk of serious birth defects. If you are pregnant, stick with using only the amount of parsley typically found in food.

    Not enough is known about the safety of using parsley in medicinal amounts during breast-feeding. It's best not to use more than typical food amounts of parsley.
  • Bleeding disorders: Parsley might slow blood clotting. In theory, taking parsley might increase the risk of bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.
  • Diabetes: Parsley might lower blood sugar levels. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use parsley.
  • Fluid retention (edema): There is a concern that parsley might cause the body to hold onto sodium (salt), and this increases water retention.
  • High blood pressure: There is a concern that parsley might cause the body to hold onto sodium (salt), and this could make high blood pressure worse.
  • Kidney disease: Don't take parsley if you have kidney disease. Parsley contains chemicals that can make kidney disease worse.
  • Surgery: Parsley might lower blood glucose levels and could interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgical procedures. Stop using parsley at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.
As always make sure you are using organic herbs as pesticides are toxic and always take normal doses, excessive amounts of anything is not good for you.

We are not doctors, lawyers, accountants or your mom.  We give out free smiles and the occasional unsolicited advice.  That being said; if you are pregnant, nursing or concerned about your health, call your mom.  Or even better, consult a doctors before consuming; particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.